Mini Code Camp

I’m doing an awesome one-night mini-code camp on August 21st. Pascal Rettig (@cykod), organizer of the Boston HTML5 Game Development meetup group, is giving me the floor to show you how to bring your awesome HTML5 skills to the fastest growing mobile platform, Windows Phone. Go here to sign up, it’s free

Before I explain what I’ll be showing you, check out the prizes I am giving away…

Awesome Giveaways!

I will be giving away some great stuff, including:

  • Bunch of swag (Swiss Army computer backpack, Purity In-Ear headphones, reprogrammable NFC stickers, t-shirts and more)
  • Nokia Lumia 822 (SIM unlocked!)
  • Nokia Lumia 920 (Engadget “Smartphone of the Year” for 2012)

Everyone who attends will get the following:

  • One-on-one attention to help build your app
  • Nokia Premium Developer Program token ($1500 value, contains a Microsoft developer license to unlock phones and publish to the store) when you email me your first app.
  • A Nokia Lumia 800 (or 900) when the app is live in the Store (you use the token above to pay for your developer account, then you can publish your app globally)

What Is This Mini Code Camp About?

I’ll be showing you how easy it is to build a native HTML5/JS game for Windows Phone. You can literally drag and drop your existing HTML5 game into a native Windows Phone app. If your game works on IE10 on a pc, 99% of the time it will work on the phone. Why? Because you are still developing for IE10 on the phone. Here is the break down of my presentation:

  1. 15-20 minutes: Intro– I’ll introduce myself and explain all the different free giveaways, rewards and resources that are available to you. Here is just some of the items I’ll guide you through to get
    1. Join Dvlup Nokia’s developer rewards program (its free. Get a loaner phone to help you develop your app and get real life rewards like computers, phones, hardware, gift cards and much more. You can even get featured global WP Store placement!) Here is my profile.
    2. Nokia’s powerful Marketing In a Box. You get free professional marketing assets. Check out my last promo video, you’ll get one too
    3. Show you how to get great revenue from your app (in app purchasing is super-easy to do in WP8. literally a few lines of code)
  2. 15 minutes: Code demo– Using an existing HTML5 game, I will show you how to bring your existing game into a WP8 app. Literally just a couple steps. You will all get the full source code and slides for the demos
  3. First Giveaway! – I will raffle off a pair of great Purity In-Ear Headphones and a Wenger Swiss Army TSA ready computer backpack
  4. Break: Eat! I will also provide on-on-one help on installing the WP8 SDK on your machine. I’ll be bringing the SDK on USB drives as well.
  5. 15 minutes: Using middleware- I will demo using the Unity3D game engine and deploying to the phone. The Unity3D editor is now free for Windows Phone 8 development. If you have an existing Unity3D game, you’re going to love this mini-session.
  6. 10 minutes: Questions/Answers- Ask me anything!
  7. Giveaway Time! – I will raffle off the Nokia Lumia 822, built for Verizon, but is SIM unlocked!

Prepare

I recommend that you install the SDK on your PC before coming to the event. You’ll be able to follow along during the group. It also will let you find any problems during installation that you may need help with. One of the requirements on building Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 apps is that you need to be running Windows 8. You can do this in a VM if you need to. There are some great articles on how to set your VM up. If you are using a Mac, you can use Parallels or Bootcamp.

I have a blog post that will step you through setting up the SDK, and also building your first app in minutes. If you have any trouble, please send me an email and I will help you every step of the way.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Lance

Nokia Lumia 822 and Lumia 800 giveaway [winner!]

[UPDATE] We have a winner!

Thank you to everyone who worked so hard to get their first app in the Windows Phone Store! Keep it up, as I have many more contests coming up. Update your app entry with a new feature, or optimize it’s layout, to get the app ready for my next contest 😉

Now, without further ado, the winner of the June giveaway… drum roll… Richard Huang of Boston, MA. Here is a link to his Windows Phone app entry for the drawing. To everyone else who didn’t enter, if you’re a developer who fits the qualifications below, email me to get a head start on my next giveaway.

Original post

I am giving away a Lumia 822 to a lucky Windows Phone Developer and a Lumia 800 to every developer where their entry is a first app.

The rules are simple:

  • You have published a new Windows Phone app (since January 1st 2013), quality requirements apply*
  • You have not won a Windows Phone 8 device from me yet
  • You’re a member of Nokia’s http://Dvlup.com (Go to http://Dvlup.com and register if you don’t have one yet)
  • You live in Massachusetts, Virginia, Illinois, Ohio, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine and Indiana
  • To qualify for the Lumia 800, it has to be your first published app in the past 12 months.

If you meet these conditions, send the following information to ext-lance.mccarthy (at) Nokia.com:

  • The URL to your app and the date it was published
  • Your Windows Phone publisher name
  • Your DVLUP username
  • Your location (City, State)

Once I verify your info, I will add you to the list and randomly draw a winner on Sunday, June 23rd.

If you do not have a DevCenter account, send me the finished app and I will give you a DevCenter account.

Ready, Set, CODE!

Lance

Fine Print: This contest is held by me and I reserve the right to change the rules if it is found to be unfair. Decision is final unless the winner explicitly passes on the prize or is found to be ineligible.

*Quality requirement: The app cannot be a flashlight app or a one page RSS reader (unless it implements a special feature like speech) and must follow the Windows Phone UI design. You need to also leverage the three different live tile sizes.

Hackathon Winners

I will be writing a more in-depth blog post (with videos and event pictures) on the Telerik website when all the media is done being edited. For now, I wanted to quickly get a post up to show the winners of The Boston Hackathon. There were over 40 apps created, submitted and presented! Every developer who went through my grueling training schedule on day one, built their app, got it in by 3:30PM on day two and had the courage to present to the audience, earned a Nokia Premium Developer Program token ($1,500 value)! They will all be able to publish their apps to the Windows Phone Store.

Go here and see the comments on this photo. The comments are from the developers who participated and give you a great insight into the event.

Without further ado, here are the winners.

First Place

First place went to VTX (Voice Assisted Training & Exercise by Maneesh Moota and Roman Jaquez). It was a spectacular application that leveraged the power of the Telerik Design Templates and RadControls for Windows Phone. It also integrated speech, maps, accelerometer data, backend for user profiles,  RadQrCode to share workout routines and much more. Here are some screenshots:

wp_ss_20130416_0006   wp_ss_20130416_0001wp_ss_20130416_0002wp_ss_20130416_0003 wp_ss_20130416_0004 wp_ss_20130416_0005

Second Place

Second place went to LockMapper, by Jeffrey Harmon (developer of the successful app, Memorylage). This app updates your lock screen with your current location on a map, and also the live tile, with your current location and the route to your destination plotted! Jeff demonstrates his out-of-the-box thinking with this unique featuring of WP8 APIs and Telerik controls and nailed another home run..  Here are some screenshots:

wp_ss_20130416_0008 wp_ss_20130416_0009 wp_ss_20130416_0016 wp_ss_20130416_0017wp_ss_20130416_0007 wp_ss_20130416_0018

Third Place

Third place was RadLibs, by Team Hyland (Jeremiah Bryant, Anthony Russell, Kevin DiTraglia and Bryan Stump) who drove all the way from Cleveland, Ohio to participate! The app is a digital MadLib, that spits out some really funny stories from the user’s pre-chosen, random words. They used the Telerik controls throughout the app and even used the speech APIs which made the app even funnier.

UPDATE: Now available in the Windows Phone Store, get it here.

Here are some screenshots:

wp_ss_20130416_0012 wp_ss_20130416_0013 wp_ss_20130416_0014 wp_ss_20130416_0015

Conclusion

Every single developer that participated poured their heart and soul into this.  I didn’t have a chance to even take a break longer than 5 minutes, that’s how engaging these developers were. They were all full of questions. Look out world, we have a new crop of relentlessly dedicated Windows Phone developers coming your way! I couldn’t be more proud of what was accomplished this weekend, kudos to everyone involved.     Note: These are screenshots of the app as it was presented to the judges. There will most likely be improvements/changes made before being available in the Windows Phone Store.

Deep Diving with Lance

Grab your scuba gear because we’re diving into new WP8 features

Windows Phone 8 ushered in a bunch of new APIs to hook into. I am providing my Dvlup’rs with a one-on-one training experience via email (and soon, via Skype). Take a look at the topics below. I will do a mini-code camp with you on a topic of your choice, then we can apply what you’ve learned to your app idea.

Choose a topic that you would like to learn how to use (each one has several examples apps w/source)

  1. Introducing WP8 Development
  2. Designing WP8 Applications
  3. Building WP8 Applications & Async (2 sessions)
  4. Files and Storage
  5. WP8 Application Lifecycle
  6. WP8 Background Agents
  7. Local Database
  8. Tiles and Lockscreen Notifications
  9. Push Notifications
  10. Using Phone resources
  11. App to App Communication
  12. Network Communication
  13. Proximity Sensors and Bluetooth
  14. Using Speech
  15. Maps and Location
  16. Wallet and In-app Purchase (2 sessions)
  17. Windows Phone Store
  18. Enterprise Publishing and Distribution
  19. Developing for Windows 8 and WP8

Send me an email with “Deep Dive” in the subject line to ext-lance.mccarthy@nokia.com, let me know which topic(s) you would like to dig into. I will follow up and help you in any way I can.

Here is a quick map that Matthias Shapiro uses, it’s a great reference:

demoImageMap

NOTE: If you are not in my region, I will connect you to your local Nokia Ambassador to follow up with you.

Rewarding Quality

Offer ends Feb 11th, 2013 5:00 PM PST

So you’ve published an app and you’ve worked hard to keep its rating at 4+ stars. You’ve had at least 50 ratings, proving that it’s not a fluke. Now what? Let me bring you into the fold of the elite.

You and your app will get:

  • Windows Phone Store Placement
  • App Highlights Placement (Nokia’s app that is preinstalled on all new Nokia Lumias)
  • NAX Credits for you to advertise your app in other apps

So if you meet the conditions (has minimum 50 ratings, is currently 4 stars or higher, and you’re DVLUP member or eligible to be) send me an email ext-lance.mccarthy@nokia.com

Registering Extensions

With the entrance of Visual Studio 2012 we saw a new interface to edit your WMAppManifest file. This is a great tool to help you properly setup your app’s meta data. There is one limitation you should be aware of… there is no support for extensions. What are extensions? They are the added functionality that lets you tie your app into other parts of the OS and user experience. This blog post will cover the extensions for photos, but the process is the same for other extensions.

Here is a list of the photo related extensions:

Extension point Extension name URI keywords Learn more…
Photos Hub Photos_Extra_Hub 7.1, 8.0 Extending the Photos Hub for Windows Phone
Share picker Photos_Extra_Share ShareContent, FileId 7.1, 8.0 Extending the share picker for Windows Phone
Rich media app Photos_Rich_Media_Edit RichMediaEdit, token 8.0 Rich media extensibility for Windows Phone 8
Photo edit picker Photos_Extra_Image_Editor EditPhotoContent, FileId 8.0 Extending the photo edit picker for Windows Phone 8
Photo apps picker Photos_Extra_Viewer token 7.1 Extending the photo apps picker for Windows Phone 7

Each extension has it’s own target, make sure you are using the right one for your app. In my case, I am targeting Windows Phone 8 only. So I’ll be using all of the above except for the “Photos_Extra_Viewer” extension (it only targets WP7).

Now comes the confusing part. when you open your WMAppManifest file in Visual Studio 2012, you’ll be greeted with the new editor (image below, click for full size).

editor1new

If you were to look for a way to give your app extensibility, you won’t find any options in the new editor to do that. So what do you do? Edit the XML manually.

Here’s how:

  1. Go to your Solution Explorer
  2. Expand the “Properties” folder
  3. Right click on WMAppManifest.xml file
  4. Select XML (Text) editor

editor2

Visual Studio will open the file in the text editor and you will be able to make direct changes to your file. You’ll even have IntelliSense support to help guide you. With the file open, create a new Extensions parent ( like this: <Extensions></Extensions> ) inside the <App></App> parent and add the extensions you want your app to use.

Here are mine (click image for full size):

editor3

That’s it! Your app will now register the extensions with the OS. I recommend reading this section of the documentation on Photo Extensibility for Windows Phone. It will give you a better understanding of how this works, pitfalls to avoid and possible incompatibilities.  Armed with this information, you will be well on your way to providing the user with a more integrated experience.

Good luck and Happy Coding!

From The Ground Up

This post is to get you started on Windows Phone Development “from the ground up” and is targeted towards people who have no prior experience with the Windows Phone SDK.  At any time you can refer to my resources page for additional links to WPDev assets, tutorials and example code.

Ok, let’s begin.

The first thing you should know is that is does not cost a penny to develop for Windows Phone! The SDK and the tools are free. The only time you will need to pay is when you sign up for your Microsoft DevCenter account. The DevCenter is your portal to the Windows Phone Store. It is where you will submit, update and track your apps. I can help mitigate those costs for you. If you are an Android or iOS Developer and are porting an app, or a true “from the ground up” developer,  I will pay for your first year’s DevCenter fee. Contact me for details.

Now, we need to go over some minimum requirements that you’ll need to meet in order to use the different versions of the SDK.

Step 1: Minimum Environment Requirements

Windows Phone 8 SDK: If you are looking to write Windows Phone 8 (WP8) apps, here are the minimum requirements. If you do not have access to a Windows 8 (Win8) machine or cannot upgrade your machine to Win8, you can install and run Win8 in a VM. If you install the WP8 SDK, you also can develop for Windows Phone 7.x (WP7).

Supported operating systems: Windows 8, Windows 8 Pro

Operating system type:

  • Windows 8 64-bit (x64) client versions

Hardware:

  • 6.5 GB of free hard disk space
  • 4 GB RAM
  • 64-bit (x64) CPU

Windows Phone 8 Emulator:

  • Windows 8 Pro edition or greater
  • Requires a processor that supports Second Level Address Translation (SLAT)

If your computer meets the hardware and operating system requirements, but does not meet the requirements for the Windows Phone 8 Emulator, the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 will install and run. However, the Windows Phone 8 Emulator will not function but you can still deploy to a physical phone!

Windows Phone 7 SDK: Whenever I reference Windows Phone 7 in my posts, I am speaking about Windows Phone 7.1 (AKA Mango/Tango).

Supported operating systems: Windows 7, Windows Vista

  • Windows® Vista® (x86 and x64) with Service Pack 2 – all editions except Starter Edition
  • Windows 7 (x86 and x64) – all editions except Starter Edition
  • Installation requires 4 GB of free disk space on the system drive.
  • 3 GB RAM
  • Windows Phone Emulator requires a DirectX 10 or above capable graphics card with a WDDM 1.1 driver

The Windows Phone SDK 7.1 is compatible with the final version of Visual Studio 2010 SP1.

Step 2: Download and install the SDK

In the links below it is very important to read the “Overview” section before installing the SDKs. There are nuances that may apply to you and are good to know in general. The download you’ll get is a small file that when run will start the installation. You will need a data connection to install, however if you don’t have a connection, you can alternatively download an ISO version.

Windows Phone 8 SDK (download it from here):

  • Choose the language version you want to install and click the Download button for the WPexpress_full.exe file. Follow the instructions to install the SDK. Note that each localized version of Windows Phone SDK 8.0 is designed to function with the corresponding localized operating system and localized version of Visual Studio 2012.  Note – Windows Phone SDK 8.0 installs side-by-side with previous versions of the Windows Phone SDK. You don’t need to uninstall previous versions before beginning this installation.
  • Download the release notes which are in a separate file. For Windows Phone SDK 8.0 documentation and samples, see theWindows Phone Dev Center.
  • To start VS Express for Windows Phone, click the application in the Apps list. If you have Visual Studio Professional, Premium or Ultimate installed on the computer, the VS Express for Windows Phone shortcut won’t appear. Instead, start your Visual Studio instance as usual and then create Windows Phone SDK 8.0 projects using the installed Windows Phone templates.
  • If you try to run a project in Windows Phone Emulator and Hyper-V is not enabled, you will be prompted to turn on Hyper-V. Turning on Hyper-V requires you to restart your computer.

Note: this release is also available in .iso format. Choose one of the following options for handling downloaded ISO images:

  • (Recommended) Write the image file to a blank DVD.
  • (Alternative) Mount the image file virtually as DVD devices.

For more information about these options, see “What are ISO image files and how do I use them?” on the FAQ page.

Windows Phone 7 SDK (Get the 7.1 SDK here and the 7.1.1 SDK here)

There are two SDKs for WP7 development, the first one (7.1) is the full SDK and the second (7.1.1) is an update that adds support to develop for low memory devices. Install 7.1 first, then download and install 7.1.1 immediately afterwards. The 7.1.1 update adds an additional emulator with a lower memory cap (256MB). Windows Phone has low end devices in a lot of “emerging markets”. This is a huge opportunity for you to reach millions of devices.

Instructions for the 7.1 SDK (Do this one first):

If a pre-release version of the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 (Beta or RC) is installed on the machine, please uninstall it before installing this product. 
Click on the vm_web2.exe file in the download section above. This will start the installation of Windows Phone SDK 7.1 and install necessary components on your computer.
Please refer to the Release Notes in the download section above for additional details before running setup.
Note: this release is also available in .iso format.
Choose one of the following options for handling downloaded ISO images:

  • (Recommended) Write the image file to a blank DVD.
  • (Alternative) Mount the image file virtually as DVD devices.

For more information about these options, see “What are ISO image files and how do I use them?” on the FAQ page.

Instructions for the 7.1.1 SDK update (Do this one second):

Windows Phone SDK 7.1 must be installed on your computer before you can install Windows Phone SDK 7.1.1. For more information, see Installing Windows Phone SDK.
To install Windows Phone SDK 7.1.1 Update, click the Download button for WPSDK-7.1.1-KB2669191-x86.exe file, and then follow the instructions to install the SDK.

Note: This update configures a 256-MB emulator and a 512-MB emulator as part of the installation, and so might take longer to install than a typical SDK.

Step 3: Fire it up!

Congratulations! Now that you have the environment and tools installed, you are ready to roll. You may be asking yourself, “What do I do now?”. That’s a good question. To answer it, I will have you  write your very first Windows Phone app. My instructions from now on will be using the Windows Phone 8 SDK, most of the steps are the same. If you are using the WP7 SDK and something doesn’t make sense to you, contact me and I’ll give you a custom lesson.

  • Open Visual Studio Express (If you already have Visual Studio installed on your machine, use it instead of the Express version)
  • Go to File > New > Project
  • In the window that just opened select the following

StepsForNewPanoApp

  1. Make sure you have Windows Phone selected
  2. Select Windows Phone Panorama App
  3. Name your project
  4. Click OK.

Visual Studio will now ask you to choose a Windows Phone version. There is one thing you should know at this point. If you build an app as a WP7 app, it will work on WP7 and WP8 devices. If you build a WP8 app, it will only work on WP8 devices. In most basic scenarios, you should choose WP7 (7.1) and then update your app to WP8 afterwards. You will only be able to target WP8 if you need a feature that only WP8 offers (ex. NFC, Bluetooth, etc).

TargetVersionSS

Once you click OK, Visual Studio will automatically generate all the files you need to run and deploy the app. In fact, this app you just created is ready to build and deploy. Complete with example data and ViewModel!

Step 4: Build and Deploy

Now that you’ve got a project open in Visual Studio and it is ready to be deployed to an emulator or device (you can debug/deploy to a developer unlocked device via USB cable), it’s time to build and debug. Familiarize yourself with the image below (full size image):

VS2012ui

I always say the best lesson is the one you did hands-on, so go ahead and click the little green debug arrow to debug your project. If the emulator isn’t already open, Visual Studio will fire it up for you. If this is your first time running the emulator, Windows 8 will ask for Hyper-V permission, this only happens once. Once that’s done, your app will launch inside the emulator.

It will take some time to become more familiar with the process involved and learn more about the infrastructure of a Windows Phone app, but you are on your way. Congrats, you are now officially a Windows Phone developer.

Denied?

So, you got an email from DVLUP stating that your challenge submission was denied.  Why were you denied? What did you miss?  I wanted to write this post to share the top reasons for denial and how to fix it… 90% of these are due to the fact you didn’t edit your WMAppManifest file.

Here are the top offenders:

  • Not all Live Tiles Sizes
  • No animated Tiles
  • Not all WP8 resolutions

#1- You need to have all three tile sizes enabled for your app. Here is a list of the tile sizes from the MSDN Documentation. To rectify this problem, simply toggle the “Support for large Tiles” property in your WMAppManifest file. See the image in answer #2 for more details.

Tile Sizes

#2- Your app failed because the tiles were static. You need to bring your pinned tiles to life with one of the tile templates. Below is an example, find more here in the MSDN Documentation:

Cyclic Template– This template rotates between 1 to 9 images for your pinned tile. To meet the challenge’s requirement you need to have at least 2 images. Here is a quick and easy way to setup a tile from an event handler:


CycleTileData cycleTile = new CycleTileData()
{
Title = &quot;DVLUP Rules&quot;;
Count = 2;
SmallBackgroundImage = new Uri(&quot;/Images/smallBackgroundImage.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative);

// An array of URIs will do the trick
CycleImages = new Uri[]
{ // You can have up to 9 images
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage1.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage2.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage3.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage4.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage5.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage6.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage7.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage8.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
new Uri(&quot;/Images/cycleImage9.jpg&quot;, UriKind.Relative),
}
};

Another way to setup the Cyclic Template is directly in your WMAppManifest file by assigning an image directly like this:

2012-12-13_1150

#3- Your app needs to support all three Windows Phone resolutions. This link will take you to the MSDN documentation on how to target different resolutions. Here is a screenshot of the new resolutions for Windows Phone from the docs and also my WMAppManifest file.

2012-12-13_1143

2012-12-13_0927

Great, now you’re armed with the information you need to resubmit your application. Update your app through DevCenter, once it’s live in the Store go back into DVLUP and resubmit the app to the challenge. If you have any questions, send me an email to ext-lance.mccarthy(at)nokia(dot)com.

Comatose Cursor

You’re sitting in front of your PC, steaming cup of <insert favorite beverage here> next to you and your fingers are posed over the keyboard ready to strike. Visual Studio is full screen and Expression Blend is waiting to assist in the background, but your cursor is blinking steadily in the same place it was 15 minutes ago. You’re blank, the ideas aren’t flowing, the classes of objects haven’t materialized yet.

Let me help you break out of developer limbo, out from the prison of digital purgatory, by laying out some app ideas for you. Some of these ideas are almost done, with complete source code, and are vying to be published. UPDATE: Music Lab has been taken.

Let’s start with Music Lab, an app that is an awesome companion app for the Windows Phone user to run while they are listening to music. This is an app that was given to me by Travis Lowdermilk, with the hopes of bringing it to market. I was however at the end of a dev cycle and starting a new job that was taking up a lot my time. Other than exploring the code and making some initial changes to get it ready for the world, I never brought it to Marketplace readiness. So here is my offer, the first developer in my region who needs an app idea and is willing to take it to market, I will give you the source code (I already ran this idea by Travis and he is on board, we both want to see it a reality).

If I give you the app, it will then become your torch to bear. It will be your first priority. I don’t want it to fall the wayside like it did for me. Also, I’ll only be giving it to one dev, so I’ll want to make sure you’re making progress. If you can’t devote your time to it, let me give it another dev. If you’re interested, send me an email and I’ll give you the awesomeness that it is.

Now on to the next app idea, NewsBlur for Windows Phone. There is no source code for this app. Rather it is an app in high demand and people are waiting for it. I tried getting started on it but this is another case of, “I just don’t have the time” or “My wife will string me up if I spend all my free time on it”! I have links to the API and have been talking to the creator of NewsBlur. You’ll have direct access to his wisdom and knowledge. This isn’t your ordinary big corporation stonewall, “We don’t like 3rd party app developers funking up our baby”, no help type of project. This app is a “If you build it, they will come”, “Lance, where the hell is my NewsBlur” type of app. I can tell you that if you publish this, you will get immediate traction and free promotion. Email me for more details on how to get started with a NewsBlur app.

Now add the benefits of the two ideas I threw at you, plus the backing of me and Nokia when you publish it (DVLUP rewards and my free phone challenges) You will no longer be looking at a comatose cursor but rather you’ll become a savior of two great apps. Email me at nokia-dev(at)outlook(dot)com and I’ll get you what you need.

P.I. API

I did some investigating on the best APIs to help give you app ideas or to use for beefing up  an existing app.  Here is a list of some of the best ones out there. I’ve added these to the resources section of the site.

Have fun brainstorming!